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Video Diary 8

Things are moving along well, there's been a lot of progress on the action manager side of things.

Actions have finally moved to the UI, so you can initiate actions by clicking the appropriate button. I've set up some dummy actions to show what happens visually when actions are taken, but the actual dice rolls and such are yet to be integrated. The UI objects are also being added, though some are non functional or empty at the moment.


http://youtu.be/0wPBLG-3J2Q
Click on the image to see this week's development video.

Every time I add something big I also add about a dozen small things. Like the selection box visualization. Previously this was using render.drawline, and old fashioned Blender function which can be impossible to see at certain resolutions, or at certain frequencies. I replaced it with a function that adds planes of the right size and scale in the right location.

I also made all characters a little bigger. I still need to do some work with vectors and final target locations to make sure that characters get as close to a target as the need to be for realistic combat, but not too close.

I'll be needing some testers soon, if anyone is interested in killing some giant rats. :)

Comments

  1. starting to look like a game. I really like the vertical menu bar - it shows a different look that other games use.
    I did notice an odd flickering with the shadows though?
    Also, when you select a character, there is no (quick) visual clue as to the fact it is selected. in multiple character situations, you might not know which is the one being selected?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks. The flickering is probably caused by the hack I have to use for multiple dynamic light sources. It looks kind of like the flickering of a torch though so I can live with it for now.
      I've resisted adding too much visual clutter in the scene so far, like always present health bars or selection circles, but I suppose it's something I can't avoid for ever. I'll just try to make it subtle. I'm excited about where the game is at now. Seems likemuch of the worst parts of coding are done, other parts like inventory, I've already got working prototypes for and it's just a matter of plugging them in.

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  2. Excellent. It's good when things come together (separately) and you can finally see them all working :)

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