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More rockets and tech timeline.

I greatly reduced the rate of fire of the rockets and made them smaller. A single 60mm rocket now takes up the same space as a machine gun. A single vehicle should mount a large number of rockets to take advantage of their power.

I also added a delay after a weapon is successfully fired. This means the rockets will fire in a staggered volley instead of all at once. I tried both styles and this looks better and creates less logic spikes.

I think it needs more smoke and I'll be adding some rocket trails too.

I'm still unsure of where to put the rockets in the tech ladder. In real life the Russians developed their rockets before the German invasion. They were first deployed in 1941.

These early rockets were quite small though larger ones were developed later.
The Germans designed and tested their first rockets as early as 1940 but they were not deployed until 1941. Larger rockets were introduced later.

The rockets weren't mounted on vehicles until 1943, by which time the Americans had started producing their own rocket carrier.
I'm going to make the smaller rockets level 3, which puts them around 1941 levels of technology, while the larger ones will be level 4 which would put them around 1943.

Actually, now is a good time to talk about tech levels. I've set up the vehicle components so they follow a simple schedule based on tech levels from real life:
The current scope of the game is from 1936-1940, the first stage of the Vinland Crusade and the Northern Revolts. This makes equipment from level 0 to level 2 available, with level 3 and 4 equipment available as "prototypes" which can be bought at a much higher price and limited availability.

Each level allows the creation of a vehicle which is superior to those from the previous level. In theory if you had a vehicle which is all level 3, you could easily defeat a level 2 vehicle.

However, levels are split for each kind of technology and differ depending on faction.
For example, Vinland gets access to level 5 engine technology by 1943, but their weapons don't reach that pinnacle until spring 1948. The Europeans start out with level 2 technology almost across the board, but are much slower to adapt because of their long supply lines and entrenched military customs. Later in the war they are suffering a complete breakdown, with war weariness and revolts crippling their wartime economy. They lose their early lead and by 1945 they are only ahead on weapons and infantry.

This should give more interesting design philosophies, where some vehicles are far ahead in one area, but lagging in another.  


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